Undergraduate Courses - Political Science

Undergraduate Courses - Political Science

PS 1000. Introduction to Political Science

3 credits / Fall, Spring
A study of political science as a discipline; the course is divided into two parts. The first part familiarizes the student with the scope and content of politics and introduces the main approaches used to study political phenomena. The second part applies the general Appalachian State University Undergraduate Bulletin 2009-2010 knowledge acquired in the first part to the study of a selected number of actual political systems. (MULTI-CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 1100. American National Government and Politics

3 credits / Fall, Spring
GEN ED: Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "This American Life")
A study of the development and operation of the American national government, its powers, organization and policies. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 1200. Current Political Issues

3 credits / Fall, Spring
A study of the current political issues and problems facing the national government. Problems in such areas as labor, education, the economy, agriculture, equal rights, foreign relations and national security will be analyzed. Not open to students with credit for PS 1201. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 1201. Contemporary Political Controversies

3 credits / Fall, Spring
An examination of some leading controversies in politics from the perspective of the conflicting arguments, designed to foster understanding of the issues and to enhance critical thinking and speaking skills. Intended primarily for students majoring or minoring in political science. Not open to students with credit for PS 1200. (SPEAKING) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 2120. International Politics and Foreign Policy

3 credits / Fall, Spring
An introduction to the study of international politics and foreign policy. Students will be introduced to a variety of analytical approaches to the study of global relations, including the participant, the systemic, the perceptual, and the instrumental frameworks. Students will be exposed to the complexities of international affairs and global relations which are the result of the confluence of historical, geographical, economic, cultural, and political factors. (MULTI -CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 2130. State and Local Government

3 credits / Fall, Spring
An examination of the organization, problems and powers of state and local governments in the United States, focusing upon the responses of states, counties, and municipalities to needs caused by poverty, growth, and social change. (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 2160. Introduction to Public Administration

3 credits / Fall, Spring
A general survey course aimed at introducing the student to the theory and practice of public administration. The course includes an introduction to organization theory, personnel and financial administration, and administrative responsibility. The principal focus is on American public administration, but some comparisons and illustrations from other administrative systems are included.

PS 2240. Comparative Politics

3 credits / Fall, Spring
An examination of political system challenges and development patterns, with comparative reference to a number of systems including the Former Soviet Union, Britain, France, and selected African, Asian, and Latin American countries. (MULTI -CULTURAL) (CORE: SOCIAL SCIENCES)

PS 2500. Independent Study

1-3 credits / Fall, Spring

PS 2610. Asian Politics

3 credits / On Demand
This course surveys the politics of East and Southeast Asia. It focuses on the experiences of everyday people dealing with political worlds different from our own. The readings include a mix of fictional and scholarly writing.

PS 3001. Writing in Political Science

3 credits / Fall, Spring
GEN ED (EFFECTIVE: SPRING, 2010): Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)
This course concentrates upon different writing traditions within political science. It requires students to apply the rhetorical knowledge gained in previous writing courses to the discipline of political science. Students will be expected to read and analyze texts in one or more of the sub-disciplines of political science as well as write effectively in one or more of the writing traditions of political science (e.g., research paper, policy analysis, briefing memo, text review). In addition to effective communication, the course emphasizes critical thinking, local to global connections, and community responsibility within the context of political science. Prerequisite: must be majoring in political science. (WRITING)

PS 3110. Political Theory Through Sixteenth Century

3 credits / Fall, alternate even-numbered years
An examination of political theory from approximately 300 B.C. through the sixteenth century. The political philosophers studied include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, and Jean Bodin. Emphasis is placed on historical development of political philosophy. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

PS 3115. Research Methods

4 credits / Fall, Spring
An introduction to the logic and techniques of social science research with computer applications, examination of the structure of scientific inquiry, methods utilized to analyze information, with emphasis placed upon the interpretation of that information. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. Required of all PS and CJ majors. Prerequisite: STT 1810 or the equivalent. (Same as CJ 3115.) (NUMERICAL DATA; COMPUTER) (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

PS 3121. International Terrorism

3 credits / Spring
This course introduces the student to the characteristics of international terrorism, the causes of terrorism, and the control of terrorism. Throughout, students are presented key concepts to which they can refer for analyzing the future of international terrorism. (Same as CJ 3121.)

PS 3130. American Political Parties and Interest Groups

3 credits / Fall
A study of the organization, tactics and functions of political parties and interest groups. A comparison of goals and methods of influencing public policy ranging from the normal to the revolutionary. Campaigning techniques discussed.

PS 3150. Constitutional Law

3 credits / Fall
This course is designed to introduce students to the role of the courts (particularly the U.S. Supreme Court) as instruments of change in the United States. The course will examine the powers of the judiciary and the limitations placed on the exercise of the courts' powers. The courts and their role as interpreters of the Constitution will be seen primarily through an examination of Supreme Court decisions. (WRITING)

PS 3210. Political Theory From the Seventeenth Century to the Present

3 credits / Spring
A study of political thought from the seventeenth century to the present. Political philosophers studied include Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Bentham, Marx, and Lenin. Emphasis is placed on the development of nationalism, capitalism, communism, socialism, and fascism. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY )

PS 3230. American Legislative Politics

3 credits / Spring
An examination of the structure, functions and behavior of Congress and state legislatures, with emphasis on how composition, leadership, constituency role orientations and interest groups actively influence public policy. The legislative institutions are also viewed in relationship to larger environments and inclusive political systems.

PS 3280. Public Policy Analysis

3 credits / Fall
A study of the policy-making process, with special attention to the various factors that influence policy choices in the American government and an examination of the procedures for evaluating actual and alternative public policy programs. (WRITING)

PS 3310. Political Ideologies

3 credits / On Demand
A survey of the central ideas of various philosophers from the early Enlightenment to the late Twentieth Century. Special emphasis will be given to a breadth of political ideas and ideologies, stressing the direct relationship between concepts and political life. (SPEAKING; MULTI -CULTURAL)

PS 3320. Global Conflict and Mediation: The UN

3 credits / Fall
This course introduces students to the United Nations and its role in global conflict and mediation. Topics include basic facts about the United Nations institutions and functions, as well as the competing positions of various countries within the United Nations on specific issues. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL)

PS 3330. Urban Politics

3 credits / Spring
A focus upon politics in urban areas. Topics include the problems of urban government, politics within metropolitan areas, community power structures, and decision-making structures.

PS 3410. Marxism

3 credits / On Demand
Explores the basic principles and features found within Marxist thought. This includes some discussions of Marx's immediate predecessors such as Hegel and Feuerbach in post-Marxist socialist and communist literature. (MULTI -CULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

PS 3500. Independent Study

1-3 credits / Fall, Spring

PS 3520. Instructional Assistance

1 credit / Fall, Spring
A supervised experience in the instructional process on the university level through direct participation in a classroom situation. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.

PS 3530-3549. Selected Topics

1-4 credits / On Demand

PS 3630. Appalachian Politics

3 credits / On Demand
An examination of the fundamental political problems and possibilities for the people in the Appalachian Region. The interrelationships of Appalachia with the larger American political system, political culture, and economy will also be studied.

PS 3660. Administrative Law

3 credits / Fall
A study of the administrative powers and procedures in the United States and of the relevant experiences of some other democracies such as Britain, France with special attention to the legal and administrative methods of achieving a responsible bureaucracy and of balancing public interest with private rights.

PS 3722. America in the World

3 credits / Spring
GEN ED: Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "This American Life")
The course provides students with the foundation to understand the historical and contemporary practice of U.S. foreign policy and familiarizes them with patterns of continuity and change in U.S. foreign policy. (WRITING; SPEAKING)

PS 3888. Diversity in Justice and Public Affairs

3 credits / Fall
Critically examines race/ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, physical or mental ability and other diversity issues within criminal justice, and public affairs. This includes perspectives analyzing human rights, biological diversity, philosophical ethics, linguistic diversity, cultural diversity, and other relevant differences. (Same as CJ 3888.) (MULTI -CULTURAL)

PS 4175. Public Opinion

3 credits / Fall
An examination of attitude and opinion formation within and among publics; the role and impact of government secrecy on opinion; and a study of media as influence mechanisms.

PS 4220. Globalization

3 credits / Spring, alternate years
Examines the interactions of politics, economic trends and business actions as they create patterns of international stability, crisis, and change. (Same as ANT 4220.)

PS 4225. International Security

3 credits / Spring
This course examines the diverse theoretical perspectives within international relations and security studies. The class analyzes each of these perspectives critically, to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, and to help students formulate their own understanding and explanation of the dynamics of global politics and international security.

PS 4230. The Presidency and the Executive Branch

3 credits / Fall
An examination of the central role of the American presidency in the political process. Emphasis is given to contemporary responsibilities of the President and of the major agencies supporting the President. (WRITING)

PS 4270. Political Socialization

3 credits / Spring
Focuses upon the process by which political behavior is learned; analyzes the role of socialization agencies throughout the life cycle; offers cross-national comparisons; examines political elites and masses; discusses countercultural trends.

PS 4530–4549. Selected Topics in Political Science

1-4 credits / On Demand
An intensive examination of selected topics.

PS 4550. Law and Society

3 credits / Spring
An examination of the relationship between the values and culture of a society and the laws which it adopts and how law interacts with and responds to change in social values as seen by the courts through selected cases. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (Same as CJ 4550.) (WRITING; SPEAKING) [Dual-listed with PS 5550/CJ 5550.]

PS 4640. Studies in Regional Political Patterns

1-3 credits / On Demand
An examination of selected regions of the world which have common historical and cultural patterns influencing their political styles and capabilities. Topics may vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. [Dual-listed with PS 5640.]

PS 4661. Court Administration

3 credits / On Demand
This course is designed to familiarize students with the need for, and approaches to, more effective management of federal and state courts. Topics include court reform, court unification, caseload management, alternative dispute resolution, personnel management and training, and audio-visual applications in the courts, among others. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (Same as CJ 4661.) (SPEAKING) [Dual-listed with PS 5661/CJ 5661.]

PS 4670. Environmental Politics

3 credits / Spring
This course will examine the role that politics and government play in dealing with environmental issues. Its focus is primarily on the U.S. approach to environmental protection, but some attention will be devoted to international environmental relationships such as the Kyoto Protocol. The course will cover the history of environmental policy, the legal and institutional arrangements for environmental protection, major environmental policy actors, current environmental controversies, and global environmental concerns.

PS 4680. Organized Crime

3 credits / Fall, alternate years
This course will provide an examination and analysis of views on the phenomena of organized crime and efforts to control it. Attention will be paid to criminal organizations in the United States, their beginnings in other cultural and ethnic backgrounds and their relations with criminal organizations around the world. In today's world, criminal organizations in other countries and their activities have a major impact on crime in the United States. Therefore, a comparative approach to the subject must be used. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (Same as CJ 4680.) [Dual-listed with PS 5680/CJ 5680.]

PS 4710. American Political Thought

3 credits / On Demand
A survey of the diverse political ideas represented in the American state from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis is given to the political problems that emerge with the process of industrialization and the movement into a postindustrial economy. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (CROSS-DISCIPLINARY) [Dual-listed with PS 5710.]

PS 4721. Human Rights

3 credits / On Demand
The course surveys the major literature in the field of international human rights. It investigates the questions of ethics, morality and the practice of human rights globally and attempts to address why the issue of international human rights has come to the fore in international politics. [Dual-listed with PS 5721.]

PS 4723. International Political Economy

3 credits / Fall, alternate years
An examination of the relationship between political and economic activity, the way actors use one to manipulate the other, and the normative choices involved in doing so. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY ) [Dual-listed with PS 5723.]

PS 4741. European Governments and Politics

3 credits / Spring, alternate years
An examination of patterns of governmental organization and socioeconomic policy outcomes in the democracies of Europe as a basis for comparative analysis. Major issues confronting the democracies will be studies for possible options and comparisons of policy. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (MULTI-CULTURAL) [Dual-listed with PS 5741.]

PS 4742. Politics of Developing Nations

3 credits / Fall, alternate years
Focuses on the efforts of a majority of the world's governments to meet the twin challenges of participatory politics and of the Global market economy. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. [Dual-listed with PS 5742.]

PS 4743. The European Union

3 credits / Spring, alternate years
The emergence of the European Union is one of the major events in European history. The course explores the genesis and evolution of the idea of European integration and chronicles its organizational development in the post-WWII era. Emphasis is placed on the politics of integration and the emergence of the Union as a major participant in world events. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL) [Duallisted with PS 5743.]

PS 4744. Middle East Politics

3 credits / Spring
An examination of the political, cultural, economic and social patterns of the Middle East. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. [Dual-listed with PS 5744.]

PS 4745. African Politics

3 credits / On Demand
The course begins with the historical context of African politics. Then, it explores the problems of governance following independence and discusses the contemporary debate between two contending schools of thought in African politics and development: Afro-optimism and Afro-pessimism. It examines Africa's relations with developing and developed countries as well. [Dual-listed with PS 5745.]

PS 4748. Latin American Politics

3 credits / Spring, alternate years
Examines Latin American politics in detail covering historical context, political actors, and current issues in Latin America. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. (WRITING; SPEAKING; MULTI-CULTURAL) [Dual-listed with PS 5748.]

PS 4800. Political Science Capstone

1 credit / Fall, Spring
GEN ED: Capstone Experience
The capstone course offers students an opportunity to synthesize the knowledge, approaches, and results from political science with the foundation established in the general education program through participation in a department-wide student paper competition. Students select a paper previously written in a political science class, revise it based upon faculty and fellow student input, and then submit the paper for consideration by the political science faculty, who will award prizes for "Best Paper in Political Science" as well as runner-ups. Prerequisite: must be majoring in political science.

PS 4900. Internship in Public Affairs

3-12 credits / Fall, Spring
Field work in government, community, professional offices and agencies and involvement in problem-solving in these offices and agencies. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: senior standing (or 90 semester hours of coursework). (WRITING)